Effect Of Mammals??? Digging Function On Alanine Aminotransferase Enzyme Activity In Leaves Of Glechoma Hederacea Under Cadmium Pollution

Abstract

O. M. Vasilyuk, A. Y. Pahomov

The paper reflects analyzes of Cd impact on the total activity (nM pyruvic acid/ml s) of Alanine aminotransferase (ALT, EC 2.6.1.2) nitrogen metabolism in Glechoma hederacea L. leaves subject (as model) which dominated in the research area (in natural floodplain oak with Stellaria holostea L.) in conditions of Cd pollution (as anthropogenic press) and digging activity by Mammalia (as biotic action, with Talpa europaea L., European mole, as model), and their combine action. The Cd was introduced in the form of salts Cd(NO3)2 in the concentrations: 0.25, 1.25, and 2,5 g/m2, equivalent to the inclusion of Cd in 1,5 and 10 doses of MAC. The content of doses of MAC of Cd (5 mg/kg soil) adding took into account. It was found the increasing of the ALT activity on 88% (with adding the Cd salts at a dose of 1 ??A?) and digging activity by Talpa europaea L. which proved the non-specific reaction on stress. We observed the repression of the enzymes according to controls (5 and 10 MAC Cd) with Cd concentration 5 and 10 MAC. The protective properties by T. europaea L. hadn’t positive results. The transferase enzyme activity according to another control (area without pollution of Cd and digging activity by T. europaea L.) reflected the inhibition of ALT on 78% t? 53% (in presence Cd 1 and 5 MAC). The digging activity by T. europaea L. promoted the toxic metal level and the normalisation of the nitrate metabolism from 25% t? 47% (ALT, 1 MAC Cd). The digging activity by Mammalia did not contribute the metal toxic effect and restoration of the natural functions of the plant organism under the Cd 10 MAC. The advisability for using the representatives of zoocenosis for the complex regulation of environmental changes in the conditions of the Ukrainian Steppe, if the antropogenic factor does not exceeds the maximum permissible significance have been founded.

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