Minerals composition of wells water and their contribution to mineral nutrition in dairy cattle: A possible approach in reducing soil salinity by reducing mineral content in manure

Abstract

M. Al-Nawaiseh, G. Al-Rabadi

Drinking water plays an essential role in farm animals through marinating unlimited biological functions within animal body. From nutritional perspective, mineral content of drinking water is not counted when formulating dairy cattle diets. No information on the contribution of drinking water to the mineral nutrition of dairy cattle has been reported in Karak governorate. This work aimed to investigate minerals contribution of wells water in Karak governorate in the relation to nutritional requirements in dairy cattle. Furthermore, this work will give insight to possible approach in reducing soil salinity through reducing macro-mineral supplementation to dairy cattle when its manure used for fertilization in Karak ecosystem. Nine samples of wells water (three replicates) were obtained from Karak governorate and were analyzed for their cation (Sodium (Na), Potassium (K) and Calcium (Ca)) and anions (Chlorine (Cl)) concentrations. In this study, both Ca and K content were not enough to make a significant contribution to dairy cattle nutrition at different production stages. The highest contribution of different water sources to daily Ca and K requirements by dairy cattle were 4.50 and 4.52%, respectively. However, the lowest contribution of water to daily Ca and K requirements by dairy cattle were 4.10 and 0.03%, respectively. On the other hand, both Na and Cl content were relatively sufficient to make a significant contribution to dairy cattle nutrition at different production stages. The highest contribution of water to daily Na and Cl requirements were 33.56 and 43.78%, respectively. However, the lowest contribution of water to daily Na and Cl requirements were 3.67 and 7.48%, respectively. It can be concluded from this study that some water drinking sources in Karak governorate can provide a significant contribution in dairy cattle nutrition at different production stages and can minimize feed formulation cost when mineral content in drinking water is counted in feed formulation. Furthermore, counting wells water contribution of minerals in formulated dairy diets can minimize minerals excretion in manure and could be an approach to reduce soil salinity in Karak ecosystem when their manures are used as fertilizers.

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