The effect of sylimevit, metifen, and milk thistle on the intensity of the processes of peroxidation of lipids in the body of laying hens in experimental chronic cadmium toxicosis

Abstract

A.Y. Ostapyuk, T.A. Holubieva, B.V. Gutyj, S.O. Slobodian

Cadmium is considered a dangerous pollutant because, due to toxic stress, it causes various disorders of the functional state of the body of animals and birds. Getting into the body in small quantities, the above element accumulates for a long time in various organs and tissues, which can cause toxicosis, accompanied by disorders of biochemical processes, structure, and function of cells. The study aimed to study the effect of sylimevit, metifen, and milk thistle on the intensity of lipid peroxidation of laying hens in experimental chronic cadmium toxicosis. Thirty-two laying hens, 78 weeks old, were selected for the study. Four experimental groups were formed: control and three experimental. Chickens of the control group (?) and three experimental groups were fed with water cadmium sulfate at a dose of 4 mg/kg body weight. Chickens of the experimental group, E1 with feed, were fed the fruits of milk thistle at a dose of 2.0 g/kg of feed daily for 30 days. Chickens of the experimental group E2 were fed metifen at a dose of 0.28 g/kg of feed once a day for 30 days. Chickens of the experimental group E3 were fed sylimevit at a dose of 0.36 g/kg of feed once a day for 30 days. Watering chickens with cadmium sulfate water in a toxic dose contributed to the development of oxidative stress. Under conditions of intoxication of laying hens with cadmium sulfate at a dose of 4 mg/kg body weight, the most pronounced changes in the intensity of lipid peroxidation (lipid hydroperoxides increased by 40.2%, diene conjugates by 32.9%, TBA-active products by 29.3%). The use of cadmium-loaded feed to experimental chickens helped suppress the intensity of lipid peroxidation processes and reduce the formation of a large number of free radicals and reactive oxygen species, which could further lead to oxidative stress. Additional introduction to the diet of laying hens of milk thistle, metifen, and sylimevit had an inhibitory effect on the intensity of lipid peroxidation in chickens. Thus, the concentrations of primary, secondary, and final products of lipid peroxidation in the blood of laying hens of the experimental groups at all stages of the study were lower (P<0.05–0.001) than in control.

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